Sport Photography Group

The coordinator is Andrew Denny

FAQ

What we do:

Sports SIG members inform each other of upcoming sporting events and arrange accreditation and access where possible. So far we’ve covered 2 major events – the SA Life Saving Champs at Camps Bay in April and the Spur Cape Town International u/18 Hockey Festival at Hartleyvale in July.

What we don’t do:

We’re all involved with other SIGs so consensus is that we won’t hold regular meetings.

Definition of Sports Photography

We discovered we don’t share a common understanding of the genre. So we’ve adopted the PSSA salon definition which classifies Sports Photography under PHOTOJOURNALISM, alongside Street Photography and Photo Travel. Under this definition, manipulation is not allowed.

“Photojournalism entries are images with informative content and emotional impact which usually include human interest, documentary, news or sport. The journalistic value of the image shall receive priority over the pictorial quality.

In the interest of credibility, PJ images that misrepresent the truth and model or staged set-ups are not permitted.”

Sports Photography

Sports photography covers any aspect of a sporting event. Images must depict an active pastime or recreation involving physical exertion and/or skill that is governed by a set of rules or customs and often of a competitive nature. Images in this section could include the spectators or judge or umpire in a sporting event.

 Sports Action Photography

Similar to Sports Photography but should show sports people in action. Images must depict an active pastime or recreation involving physical exertion and/or skill that is governed by a set of rules or customs and often of a competitive nature. The level of sport can range from children playing a sport to the Olympic Games.

Some characteristics of Sports Photography:

  • Real. The subjects are 100% focused on their activity so facial expressions are intense and genuine.
  • Difficult. You don’t control the lighting. The subject won’t always face the direction you want. You can’t ask for a redo.
  • Fast-moving. Focus is tricky.
  • Expensive. You need a good telephoto lens.
  • Dangerous. Sometimes the action is rushing towards you at speed and you need to be ready to take evasive action. Never turn your back on waves or hockey balls!

General wisdom:

  • It really helps to understand the sport you’re photographing. It helps you anticipate where and when the interesting activity will happen.
  • Small groups work best for sports photography. You don’t get in the way of the activity or up the nose of the organiser.